Latest posts

USS Ronald Reagan

USS Ronald Regan (CVN 76)

Construction of the ninth Nimitz class ship took place at Northrop Grumman Newport News, Virginia starting with the ship’s keel laying February 12, 1998, and christened by Mrs. Nancy Regan on March 4, 2001.  USS Ronald Regan was commissioned during a ceremony on July 12, 2003.  Vice President Cheney delivered the principal address while Nancy Reagan, wife of the ship’s namesake, served as the ship’s sponsor.  On May 27, 2004 USS Ronald Reagan departed Naval Station Norfolk to circumnavigate South America on its way to its new homeport of Sand Diego.

USS Ronald Regan departed San Diego on January 4, 2006 for her maiden deployment to conduct naval operations in support of the Global War on Terrorism.  This included supporting the missions Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. By May 29, USS Ronald Regan and Carrier Air Wind Fourteen concluded military operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. 

In August 2015, USS Ronald Reagan departed San Diego as the Forward Deployed Naval Force (FDNF) replacement for USS George Washington (CVN 73) in Yokosuka, Japan.

 

#Aircraftcarriermonth

 

Read more

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75)

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) is the eighth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier of the United States Navy.  The ship’s callsign is Lone Warrior, and she is currently homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

Harry S. Truman was launched on 7 September 1996 and commissioned on 25 July 1998.  President Bill Clinton was the keynote speaker.

Harry S. Turman was initially the flagship of Carrier Group Two and, beginning 1 October 2004, of Carrier Strike Group Ten.

Beginning in 2001, the Harry S. Truman Carrier Battle Group participated in Operation Joint Endeavor, Operation Deny Flight, Operation Southern Watch, Iperating Enduring Freedom – Afghanistan, Operation Iraqi Freedom, Summer Pulse ’04, and NATO Operation Medshark/Majestic Eagle ’04.

In the first half of 2016, Harry S. Truman, as flagship of Carrier Strike Group 8, carried out an 8-month air operation deployment against ISIL from the Eastern Mediterranean as part of Operation Inherent Resolve.  The ship has been the flagship of Carrier Strike Group 8 since June 2014.

 

#Aircraftcarriermonth

Read more

History of Aircraft Carriers

Aircraft carriers are warships that evolved from balloon-carrying wooden vessels into nuclear-powered vessels carrying scores of fixed and rotary-win aircraft.  Since their introduction they have allowed naval forces to project air power great distances without having to depend on local bases for staging aircraft operations.

Balloon carriers were the first ships to deploy manned aircraft, used during the 19th and early 20th century, mainly for observation purposes.  The advent of fixed-wing aircraft in 1902 was followed in 1910 by the first fight from the deck of a US Navy cruiser.  Seaplanes and seaplane tender support ships, such as HMS Engadine, followed.  The development of flat top vessels produced the first large fleet ships.  This evolution was well underway by the early to mid-1920s, resulting in the commissioning of ships such as Hosho (1922), HMS Hermes (1924).  Beam (1927), and the Lexington-class aircraft carriers (1927).

Most early aircraft carriers were conversions of ships that were laid down (or had even served) as different ship types: cargo ships, cruisers, battlecruisers, or battleships.  During the 1920s, several navies started ordering and building aircraft carriers that were specifically designed as such.  This allowed the design to be specialized to their future role and resulted in superior ships.  During the Second World War, these ships would become the backbone of the carrier forces of the Us, British, and Japanese navies, known as fleet carriers.

World War II saw the first large-scale use of aircraft carriers and induced further refinement of their launch and recovery cycle leading to several design variants.  The USA built small escort carriers, such as the USS Bogue, as a stop-gap measure to provide air support for convoys and amphibious invasions.  Subsequent light aircraft carriers, such as USS Independence, represented a large, more “militarized” version of the escort carrier concept.  Although the light carriers usually carried the same size air groups as escort carriers, they had the advantage of higher speed as they had been converted from cruisers under construction.

The earlies recorded instance of using a ship for airborne operations occurred in 1806, when Lord Cochrane of the Royal Navy launched kites from the 32-gun frigate HMS Pallas in order to drop propaganda leaflets.  The proclamations against Napoleon Bonaparte, written in French, were attached to kites, and the kite strings were set alight; when the strings had burned through, the leaflets landed on French soil.

 

#Aircraftcarriermonth

Read more

John C. Stennis CVN-74

Mission and Capabilities of the CVN-74

The mission of John C. Stennis (named for Democratic Senator John C. Stennis of Mississippi) and her wing is to conduct sustained combat air operations while forward-deployed.  The embarked air wing consists of eight to nine squadrons.  Attached aircraft are Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornet, EA-18G Growler, MH-60R, MH-60S, and E-2C Hawkeye.

The air wing can engage enemy aircraft, submarines, and land targets, or lay mines hundreds of miles from the ship. 

Currently the USS John C. Stennis is at Norfolk, Virginia for refueling complex and overhaul, which began in 2019.  After completion which should be this year, she will return to Bremerton, Washington.

 

#Aircraftcarriermonth

Read more

USS George Washington - CVN 73

USS George Washington (CVN-73) is a United States Navy nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, the sixth carrier in the Nimitz class and the fourth US Navy ship named after George Washington, commander-in-chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War and the first president of the United States.  Her keel was laid on 25 August 1986, she was christened on 21 July 1990 by First Lady Barbara Bush, and she was commissioned at Naval Station Norfolk on 4 July 2992.  In 2008, USS George Washington became the first nuclear powered aircraft carrier to be forward deployed at naval base Yokosuka, Japan.  Since August 2017, the carrier has been in her four-year Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH), which is expected to be completed by August 2021. 

 

#Aircraftcarriermonth

Read more